saturday mornings

Ask me anything   Musings from an educator, writer and photographer.

yeahwriters:

kimberlycares:

baimbaie:

captainspensaurus:

the fact that there’s only about 5000 people who’ve reblogged this scares me. That means that less that 5000 people know where these come from.
I feel old…

very odd

I kbow

I just feel very hungry

very hungry

yeahwriters:

kimberlycares:

baimbaie:

captainspensaurus:

the fact that there’s only about 5000 people who’ve reblogged this scares me. That means that less that 5000 people know where these come from.

I feel old…

very odd

I kbow

I just feel very hungry

very hungry

(Source: somethingclassic)

— 1 month ago with 431489 notes
#very hungry literature 
http://bradbrownteaching.tumblr.com/post/76387607761/one-of-the-teachers-who-works-in-the-ninth-grade →

iamlittlei:

bradbrownteaching:

One of the teachers who works in the ninth grade wing of our building had to send letters to about 80% of her parents for Ds and Fs. And, unsurprisingly, nearly all of these were because of missing, late, or incomplete work.

I realize there are a lot of other factors going on (kids have crazy…

Preach it.

So, I will be the voice of dissent. A lot of middle schoolers don’t do the work because no one pushes them. Because it is easier to not do the work. Because D’s are acceptable and F’s are familiar. Break the cycle. I push them to do it. Yesterday, everyone did the homework before we did the (very fun) lab. No homework, no lab. A lot of us bring kids up at lunch to do the homework. Have make-up work days and reward the kids who got everything in on time. (cool computer games works well). We push them to get it done. Maybe not full credit, but most credit. We push them to the C or B. We help them create the work habits we want. And sometimes, they get there. We turn our failing students into successful students. Nag, support, drag, remind, repeat. It works. By mid-year, a lot more students have developed that work ethic. Teach them a work ethic. Many of your students don’t know what that is or what it feels like or why they would want to bother. Show them. Teach them. Help them get there. You are not just teaching your subject area. Teach good habits. Teach how to be a successful student. We are teaching children. 

(Source: powwhamteaching)

— 2 months ago with 92 notes
#homework  #middle school  #work ethic 

Julie Andrews! Love love love. Double love. Adore entirely. 

(via bbbbecky)

— 2 months ago with 375342 notes
#julie andrews  #mary poppins 
weareteachers:

Education needs to be transformed. 

Yes yes yes yes yes. Did I say yes? This is what we must do. Teachers, do this. Screw the tests. Seriously. Stop obsessing. Ignore them a lot and teach. Your students will do better anyway, if you don’t teach to the test. Transform your classroom. Just yours. WE CAN TRANSFORM EDUCATION. One classroom at a time. 

weareteachers:

Education needs to be transformed. 

Yes yes yes yes yes. Did I say yes? This is what we must do. Teachers, do this. Screw the tests. Seriously. Stop obsessing. Ignore them a lot and teach. Your students will do better anyway, if you don’t teach to the test. Transform your classroom. Just yours. WE CAN TRANSFORM EDUCATION. One classroom at a time. 

— 2 months ago with 112 notes
#transform education  #ken robinson  #common core  #public school education  #teachers 
kategardiner:

Nearly everyone agrees that recent college graduates are having an inordinately tough time finding work almost five years after the end of the Great Recession. Young people aged 18 to 34 have struggled with double-digit unemployment and account for half of the 10.9 million unemployed Americans, according to government figures.
Now a new study shows there is widespread disagreement between business leaders and young adults and their families over the root causes of this problem, beyond the obvious problem of a sluggish recovery.
Nearly three-quarters of hiring managers complain that millennials – even those with college degrees – aren’t prepared for the job market and lack an adequate “work ethic,” according to a survey from Bentley University, a private business school in Waltham, Mass. (The Surprising Reason College Grads Can’t Get a Job)

As the parent of a few of these millennials, I would like to address the “work ethic” issue. What I have seen is that the millennials have as good, if not better, work ethic than anyone. But they also have a lot less patience for nonsense. They won’t work in a bad work environment or put up with bosses who are bullies. They work hard and demand respect. It is not a lack of a work ethic when you refuse to be treated badly. It is not a lack of work ethic if you don’t want to be underpaid, or to work without benefits. It is not a lack of a work ethic that there are not enough jobs. All those companies that cut jobs? Why aren’t those jobs back? Because the folks in the middle and at the bottom are working harder for less, and the folks at the top are making a lot more. Those jobs need to come back. Pay needs to be fair and just.
They are a different breed. They have high expectations of themselves and others. It is not business as usual anymore. This is a good thing. The days of a career with one company, and tolerating a bad workplace, all for the gold watch are gone. The problem isn’t the kids. The problem is bigger and more complex. I think the kids know this, and will continue to push for things to be better. Just wait until they really get rolling. I expect great things from this generation. 

kategardiner:

Nearly everyone agrees that recent college graduates are having an inordinately tough time finding work almost five years after the end of the Great Recession. Young people aged 18 to 34 have struggled with double-digit unemployment and account for half of the 10.9 million unemployed Americans, according to government figures.

Now a new study shows there is widespread disagreement between business leaders and young adults and their families over the root causes of this problem, beyond the obvious problem of a sluggish recovery.

Nearly three-quarters of hiring managers complain that millennials – even those with college degrees – aren’t prepared for the job market and lack an adequate “work ethic,” according to a survey from Bentley University, a private business school in Waltham, Mass. (The Surprising Reason College Grads Can’t Get a Job)

As the parent of a few of these millennials, I would like to address the “work ethic” issue. What I have seen is that the millennials have as good, if not better, work ethic than anyone. But they also have a lot less patience for nonsense. They won’t work in a bad work environment or put up with bosses who are bullies. They work hard and demand respect. It is not a lack of a work ethic when you refuse to be treated badly. It is not a lack of work ethic if you don’t want to be underpaid, or to work without benefits. It is not a lack of a work ethic that there are not enough jobs. All those companies that cut jobs? Why aren’t those jobs back? Because the folks in the middle and at the bottom are working harder for less, and the folks at the top are making a lot more. Those jobs need to come back. Pay needs to be fair and just.

They are a different breed. They have high expectations of themselves and others. It is not business as usual anymore. This is a good thing. The days of a career with one company, and tolerating a bad workplace, all for the gold watch are gone. The problem isn’t the kids. The problem is bigger and more complex. I think the kids know this, and will continue to push for things to be better. Just wait until they really get rolling. I expect great things from this generation. 

(via newsweek)

— 2 months ago with 119 notes
#recession  #millennials  #jobs  #work culture  #work ethic 
"Funding is far from the only concern, but it is a threshold credibility issue. If you’re proposing a dramatic increase in outcomes and performance to reach social and academic goals that have never been reached before, and your primary investments are standards and tests that serve mostly to document how far you are from reaching those goals, you either don’t have a very good plan or you’re planning something else."

The coming Common Core meltdown (via allisonunsupervised)

If you are a teacher, a student, a parent, or a concerned citizen - you have a stake in this. It’s long, but well worth the read. 

As a 35 year veteran, I am not as upset as some of my colleagues. Some are worried, even scared of teacher evaluations based on test scores, SLO’s (student learning objectives) and a new wave of testing. That we are in a high poverty school only makes it worse. 

I know that kids are kids, that if we teach and teach well and care about our students, we will weather this storm. But at what cost? My children are out of the public school system (thank god) and I can retire any time now. 

To the young teachers - love learning, love your students, be strong. This will pass - the only question is how long, and after how much damage? Fight for better schools, the end of corporate influence, the return of respect for teachers and school based administrators, the return of local control (school boards and local superintendents) and concern for students.  Will this be another passing fad or a superstorm? Who knows. 

Fight well, teach well, be informed. Parents and citizens - be informed, speak up. You are the ones who have the power to make a difference.

(via iamlittlei)

— 2 months ago with 43 notes
#common core  #ccss  #public education  #public schools  #high stakes testing 
"It’s the year of the bush – time to rediscover all female body hair"

Emer O’Toole, the Guardian (via guardian)

Interesting. Women need to decide what they want, and not be pressured by the culture. Our bodies, our choices. Always. 

— 2 months ago with 184 notes
#feminism  #capitalism  #marketing to women  #female body hair 
angrylittledad:

Those who control the knowledge control you.

This, along with net neutrality, are part of what is becoming a defining issue of the information age - who controls information? We must be vigilant to make and keep information free and available to all. Information, knowledge will become great equalizers. Information can lead to better informed citizens, open-minded cultures, better economic opportunities. It is exactly why those in power wish to control it, and greedily earn money from it’s control, and why it is imperative that information be free, accessible, available. Governments, corporations, religions - all have a stake in controlling information. We, the many, have a stake in their not having that control.
Knowledge is power, information is the currency.

angrylittledad:

Those who control the knowledge control you.

This, along with net neutrality, are part of what is becoming a defining issue of the information age - who controls information? We must be vigilant to make and keep information free and available to all. Information, knowledge will become great equalizers. Information can lead to better informed citizens, open-minded cultures, better economic opportunities. It is exactly why those in power wish to control it, and greedily earn money from it’s control, and why it is imperative that information be free, accessible, available. Governments, corporations, religions - all have a stake in controlling information. We, the many, have a stake in their not having that control.

Knowledge is power, information is the currency.

(Source: codeawayhaley, via iamlittlei)

— 2 months ago with 538 notes
#freedom of information  #net neutrality  #information age  #knowledge is power  #free and open internet 
amandaonwriting:

Happy Birthday, Benjamin Franklin, born 17 January 1706, died 17 April 1790
10 Quotes
From a child I was fond of reading, and all the little money that came into my hands was ever laid out in books.
We are all born ignorant, but one must work hard to remain stupid.
By failing to prepare, you are preparing to fail.
Wars are not paid for in wartime, the bill comes later.
Tell me and I forget. Teach me and I remember. Involve me and I learn.
A house is not a home unless it contains food and fire for the mind as well as the body.
There never was a good war or a bad peace.
Freedom of speech is a principal pillar of a free government; when this support is taken away, the constitution of a free society is dissolved, and tyranny is erected on its ruins.
Three can keep a secret, if two of them are dead.
Either write something worth reading or do something worth writing.
Franklin was an American author, printer, political theorist, politician, postmaster, scientist, musician, inventor, satirist, civic activist, statesman, and diplomat. He invented the lightning rod, bifocals, the Franklin stove, a carriage odometer, and the glass ‘armonica’. He became wealthy publishing Poor Richard’s Almanack and The Pennsylvania Gazette.
by Amanda Patterson for Writers Write

I think Ben would support a free and open internet. See #8. Just saying.

amandaonwriting:

Happy Birthday, Benjamin Franklin, born 17 January 1706, died 17 April 1790

10 Quotes

  1. From a child I was fond of reading, and all the little money that came into my hands was ever laid out in books.
  2. We are all born ignorant, but one must work hard to remain stupid.
  3. By failing to prepare, you are preparing to fail.
  4. Wars are not paid for in wartime, the bill comes later.
  5. Tell me and I forget. Teach me and I remember. Involve me and I learn.
  6. A house is not a home unless it contains food and fire for the mind as well as the body.
  7. There never was a good war or a bad peace.
  8. Freedom of speech is a principal pillar of a free government; when this support is taken away, the constitution of a free society is dissolved, and tyranny is erected on its ruins.
  9. Three can keep a secret, if two of them are dead.
  10. Either write something worth reading or do something worth writing.

Franklin was an American author, printer, political theorist, politician, postmaster, scientist, musician, inventor, satirist, civic activist, statesman, and diplomat. He invented the lightning rod, bifocals, the Franklin stove, a carriage odometer, and the glass ‘armonica’. He became wealthy publishing Poor Richard’s Almanack and The Pennsylvania Gazette.

by Amanda Patterson for Writers Write

I think Ben would support a free and open internet. See #8. Just saying.

— 3 months ago with 136 notes
#free and open internet  #net neutrality  #ben franklin