saturday mornings

Ask me anything   Musings from an educator, writer and photographer.

Flow: For Love of Water →

Time for me to start posting again. Watch this. And if you haven’t yet, stop buying water in little bottles. 

— 1 month ago
#water  #flow for love of water  #world water crisis 

mslorelei:

Four African teenage girls have invented a urine-powered generator. This is a huge accomplishment and could change life in remote areas all over the world.

thefontnazi:

japesofwrath:

howiviewafrica:

A Urine Powered Generator. An amazing accomplishment by four brilliant girls. The girls are are Duro-Aina Adebola (14), Akindele Abiola (14), Faleke Oluwatoyin (14) and Bello Eniola (15).
 
 
  • 1 Liter of urine gives you 6 hours of electricity.

  • The system works like this:

    • Urine is put into an electrolytic cell, which separates out the hydrogen.
    • The hydrogen goes into a water filter for purification, which then gets pushed into the gas cylinder.
    • The gas cylinder pushes hydrogen into a cylinder of liquid borax, which is used to remove the moisture from the hydrogen gas.
    • This purified hydrogen gas is pushed into the generator.

This is amazing. Give them a billion dollars right now. They may have just saved the planet. 

folks are doing a PISS poor job of reblogging this.

I don’t think I can top the last comment. Nonetheless, this is awesome. 

(via amberjoyloves)

— 2 months ago with 98034 notes
#girl scientists  #aftican girl scientists  #girlsrockscience 

alexstrohl:

Iceland in fall — October 2012

Shot on Hasselblad 500C/M + Ektar 100

Iceland is on my list of places I’d like to visit someday. Perhaps in retirement, with my camera. 

(via seabluecranes)

— 2 months ago with 1099 notes
#iceland  #photography  #bucketlist 

afroklectic:

a—fri—ca:

delphine diaw diallo

 Delphine Diaw Diallo is a french senegalese photographer based in New York City. In 1999, Delphine graduated from the Académie Charpentier School of Visual Art in Paris.  In 2008, she moved to New York to pursue a career as a fine artist and quickly developed a style that juxtaposes reality with imaginary consciousness, fashion with documentary, and tradition with modernity.

Official site > delphine diaw diallo

Love this. Such interesting work.

(via seabluecranes)

— 2 months ago with 828 notes
#photography  #art 
yeahwriters:

kimberlycares:

baimbaie:

captainspensaurus:

the fact that there’s only about 5000 people who’ve reblogged this scares me. That means that less that 5000 people know where these come from.
I feel old…

very odd

I kbow

I just feel very hungry

very hungry

yeahwriters:

kimberlycares:

baimbaie:

captainspensaurus:

the fact that there’s only about 5000 people who’ve reblogged this scares me. That means that less that 5000 people know where these come from.

I feel old…

very odd

I kbow

I just feel very hungry

very hungry

(Source: somethingclassic, via yeahwriters)

— 5 months ago with 569612 notes
#very hungry literature 
http://bradbrownteaching.tumblr.com/post/76387607761/one-of-the-teachers-who-works-in-the-ninth-grade →

iamlittlei:

bradbrownteaching:

One of the teachers who works in the ninth grade wing of our building had to send letters to about 80% of her parents for Ds and Fs. And, unsurprisingly, nearly all of these were because of missing, late, or incomplete work.

I realize there are a lot of other factors going on (kids have crazy…

Preach it.

So, I will be the voice of dissent. A lot of middle schoolers don’t do the work because no one pushes them. Because it is easier to not do the work. Because D’s are acceptable and F’s are familiar. Break the cycle. I push them to do it. Yesterday, everyone did the homework before we did the (very fun) lab. No homework, no lab. A lot of us bring kids up at lunch to do the homework. Have make-up work days and reward the kids who got everything in on time. (cool computer games works well). We push them to get it done. Maybe not full credit, but most credit. We push them to the C or B. We help them create the work habits we want. And sometimes, they get there. We turn our failing students into successful students. Nag, support, drag, remind, repeat. It works. By mid-year, a lot more students have developed that work ethic. Teach them a work ethic. Many of your students don’t know what that is or what it feels like or why they would want to bother. Show them. Teach them. Help them get there. You are not just teaching your subject area. Teach good habits. Teach how to be a successful student. We are teaching children. 

(Source: powwhamteaching)

— 6 months ago with 91 notes
#homework  #middle school  #work ethic 

Julie Andrews! Love love love. Double love. Adore entirely. 

(via bbbbecky)

— 6 months ago with 445328 notes
#julie andrews  #mary poppins 
weareteachers:

Education needs to be transformed. 

Yes yes yes yes yes. Did I say yes? This is what we must do. Teachers, do this. Screw the tests. Seriously. Stop obsessing. Ignore them a lot and teach. Your students will do better anyway, if you don’t teach to the test. Transform your classroom. Just yours. WE CAN TRANSFORM EDUCATION. One classroom at a time. 

weareteachers:

Education needs to be transformed. 

Yes yes yes yes yes. Did I say yes? This is what we must do. Teachers, do this. Screw the tests. Seriously. Stop obsessing. Ignore them a lot and teach. Your students will do better anyway, if you don’t teach to the test. Transform your classroom. Just yours. WE CAN TRANSFORM EDUCATION. One classroom at a time. 

— 6 months ago with 112 notes
#transform education  #ken robinson  #common core  #public school education  #teachers 
kategardiner:

Nearly everyone agrees that recent college graduates are having an inordinately tough time finding work almost five years after the end of the Great Recession. Young people aged 18 to 34 have struggled with double-digit unemployment and account for half of the 10.9 million unemployed Americans, according to government figures.
Now a new study shows there is widespread disagreement between business leaders and young adults and their families over the root causes of this problem, beyond the obvious problem of a sluggish recovery.
Nearly three-quarters of hiring managers complain that millennials – even those with college degrees – aren’t prepared for the job market and lack an adequate “work ethic,” according to a survey from Bentley University, a private business school in Waltham, Mass. (The Surprising Reason College Grads Can’t Get a Job)

As the parent of a few of these millennials, I would like to address the “work ethic” issue. What I have seen is that the millennials have as good, if not better, work ethic than anyone. But they also have a lot less patience for nonsense. They won’t work in a bad work environment or put up with bosses who are bullies. They work hard and demand respect. It is not a lack of a work ethic when you refuse to be treated badly. It is not a lack of work ethic if you don’t want to be underpaid, or to work without benefits. It is not a lack of a work ethic that there are not enough jobs. All those companies that cut jobs? Why aren’t those jobs back? Because the folks in the middle and at the bottom are working harder for less, and the folks at the top are making a lot more. Those jobs need to come back. Pay needs to be fair and just.
They are a different breed. They have high expectations of themselves and others. It is not business as usual anymore. This is a good thing. The days of a career with one company, and tolerating a bad workplace, all for the gold watch are gone. The problem isn’t the kids. The problem is bigger and more complex. I think the kids know this, and will continue to push for things to be better. Just wait until they really get rolling. I expect great things from this generation. 

kategardiner:

Nearly everyone agrees that recent college graduates are having an inordinately tough time finding work almost five years after the end of the Great Recession. Young people aged 18 to 34 have struggled with double-digit unemployment and account for half of the 10.9 million unemployed Americans, according to government figures.

Now a new study shows there is widespread disagreement between business leaders and young adults and their families over the root causes of this problem, beyond the obvious problem of a sluggish recovery.

Nearly three-quarters of hiring managers complain that millennials – even those with college degrees – aren’t prepared for the job market and lack an adequate “work ethic,” according to a survey from Bentley University, a private business school in Waltham, Mass. (The Surprising Reason College Grads Can’t Get a Job)

As the parent of a few of these millennials, I would like to address the “work ethic” issue. What I have seen is that the millennials have as good, if not better, work ethic than anyone. But they also have a lot less patience for nonsense. They won’t work in a bad work environment or put up with bosses who are bullies. They work hard and demand respect. It is not a lack of a work ethic when you refuse to be treated badly. It is not a lack of work ethic if you don’t want to be underpaid, or to work without benefits. It is not a lack of a work ethic that there are not enough jobs. All those companies that cut jobs? Why aren’t those jobs back? Because the folks in the middle and at the bottom are working harder for less, and the folks at the top are making a lot more. Those jobs need to come back. Pay needs to be fair and just.

They are a different breed. They have high expectations of themselves and others. It is not business as usual anymore. This is a good thing. The days of a career with one company, and tolerating a bad workplace, all for the gold watch are gone. The problem isn’t the kids. The problem is bigger and more complex. I think the kids know this, and will continue to push for things to be better. Just wait until they really get rolling. I expect great things from this generation. 

(via newsweek)

— 6 months ago with 121 notes
#recession  #millennials  #jobs  #work culture  #work ethic